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Wednesday, November 29, 2017
ICAAP-lets Update - Nov. 29, 2017


 
 
November 29, 2017
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 TOP NEWS

 
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ICAAP
The Autism, Behavior, and Complex Medical Needs--Downstate (ABC-D) Conference Planning Committee is seeking presentation proposals for the 4th Annual ABC-D Conference, "Lives in the Balance: Caring for Children with Special Needs, Their Families, Their Communities, And Ourselves in These Precarious Times,” scheduled for Friday, May 4, 2018, at the Regency Conference Center in O’Fallon, IL. The conference theme has been determined by current American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) priorities and past participant feedback.

ABC-D Conference participants learn about the broad landscape of services and programs that are available to support children with special needs (including those that have been impacted by trauma and adversity) from birth through adolescence, and develop skills to make effective referrals and partner with other agencies and systems. Each track features sessions that converge with different systems, developmental services, medical interventions, and innovative partnerships that benefit children served across interprofessional groups. More information about ABC Conferences can be found here.

Proposals are due by Monday, December 4, 2017 at 5pm.


For more information, contact Elise Groenewegen at egroenewegen@illinoisaap.com or 312/733-1026 x 204.


 
 NEWS PROVIDED BY ICAAP

 
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ICAAP
The 2018 ICAAP Annual Poster Session will be held on Friday, February 23, 2018 at the Northern Illinois University (NIU) campus in Naperville. The Annual Educational Conference Planning Committee invites pediatricians, fellows, residents, medical students, pediatric nurse practitioners, and other pediatric health care providers to share their expertise in delivering pediatric care in health care settings via a poster session during the conference. Abstracts should focus on topics of relevance and interest for clinical pediatric practice. For more information and to submit an abstract, please view and complete the poster session application. Submissions are due January 22, 2018. Registration for the 2018 Annual Conference will open soon.

 
  ILLINOIS NEWS

 
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Chicago Sun-Times
Emily Cihla was born without cheekbones and without fully formed ears. She had a cleft palate and a jaw so small it couldn’t support her tongue, leaving her unable to breathe. At 17, she has had 15 surgeries to help her eat, hear and speak. Cihla has a rare genetic disorder called Treacher Collins Syndrome that affects only 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 50,000 individuals in the world, according to the National Organization for Rare Diseases.The syndrome, highlighted in the upcoming film “Wonder,” is characterized by abnormal shaping of the head and face — common symptoms include missing cheekbones, short jaws, drooping eyes and misshapen ears.  READ MORE

 
 NATIONAL NEWS

 
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AAP News
In a recent FBI operation, 120 suspected human traffickers were arrested across the U.S., and 84 child victims recovered. In 2015, Interpol and other organizations launched Operation Akoma to target traffickers in the agricultural and trade sectors of the Ivory Coast, recovering more than 48 child victims of forced labor exploitation between 5 and 16 years of age. Child trafficking violates basic human rights and constitutes a major global public health problem. It adversely impacts the physical and emotional health of the child; causes grief, trauma and disruption to the family; alters the social cohesiveness of communities; and erodes the basic human rights underlying societies.  READ MORE
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ScienceDaily
A new University of Alberta study shows that the family risk for asthma — typically passed from moms to babies — may not be a result of genetics alone: it may also involve the microbes found in a baby's digestive tract. AllerGen investigator and UAlberta microbiome epidemiologist Anita Kozyrskyj led a research team that found that Caucasian baby boys born to pregnant moms with asthma -- who are typically at the highest risk for developing asthma in early childhood — were also one-third as likely to have a gut microbiome with specific characteristics at three to four months of age.  READ MORE

 
 MISSED AN ISSUE OF ICAAP-LETS UPDATE? VISIT AND SEARCH THE ARCHIVE TODAY.

 
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The Conversation via CNN
When asked to describe a typical child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), most people would describe a young boy who climbs on things, is impatient and does not do what he is told. Few people would describe a bubbly young girl with lots of friends, who works hard to get good grades. It may be, however, that the girl does experience ADHD symptoms that interfere with her daily life -- and that these symptoms are overlooked by the adults around her.  READ MORE
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Medical Xpress
Cutting saturated fat in childrens' diets reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a University of Otago study has found. Lead author Dr Lisa Te Morenga, of the University's Department of Human Nutrition, says elevated cholesterol has been linked to cardiovascular disease in adults and preclinical markers of atherosclerosis (the build-up of fats and cholesterol on artery walls) in children which increases risk of cardiovascular disease.  READ MORE
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News-Medical.net
Autism typically involves the inability to read social cues. We most often associate this with visual difficulty in interpreting facial expression, but new research at the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that the sense of smell may also play a central role in autism. As reported in Nature Neuroscience, Weizmann Institute of Science researchers show that people on the autism spectrum have different — and even opposite — reactions to odors produced by the human body.  READ MORE

 
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ICAAP-lets Update

Connect with ICAAP

Recent Issues | Subscribe | Unsubscribe | Advertise | Web Version 


Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469-420-2601 | Download media kit
Christina Nava, Senior Editor, 469-420-2612  | Contribute news

American Academy of Pediatrics Illinois Chapter
1400 W. Hubbard, Suite 100  | Chicago, IL 60642-8195 | 312-733-1026 | Contact Us 

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Wednesday, November 22, 2017
ICAAP-lets Update - Nov. 22, 2017


 
 
November 22, 2017
Home  |   About  |   E-learning  |   Projects  |   Advocacy
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 TOP NEWS

 
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ICAAP
The Autism, Behavior, and Complex Medical Needs--Downstate (ABC-D) Conference Planning Committee is seeking presentation proposals for the 4th Annual ABC-D Conference, "Lives in the Balance: Caring for Children with Special Needs, Their Families, Their Communities, And Ourselves in These Precarious Times,” scheduled for Friday, May 4, 2018, at the Regency Conference Center in O’Fallon, IL. The conference theme has been determined by current American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) priorities and past participant feedback.

ABC-D Conference participants learn about the broad landscape of services and programs that are available to support children with special needs (including those that have been impacted by trauma and adversity) from birth through adolescence, and develop skills to make effective referrals and partner with other agencies and systems. Each track features sessions that converge with different systems, developmental services, medical interventions, and innovative partnerships that benefit children served across interprofessional groups. More information about ABC Conferences can be found here.

Proposals are due by Monday, December 4, 2017 at 5pm.


For more information, contact Elise Groenewegen at egroenewegen@illinoisaap.com or 312/733-1026 x 204.


 
 NEWS PROVIDED BY ICAAP

 
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AAP
The AAP is seeking interested participants as it launches a national Project ECHO® (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) for reproductive and pediatric environmental health through the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU) program, co-managed by the AAP.

PEHSU Project ECHO will serve as a forum for health care professionals to learn how to identify, diagnose, and treat environmentally-related health conditions in children and reproductive-age women. The ECHO sessions will occur via teleconference at regular intervals (intervals are TBD, based on survey results (e.g. weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly) and will help build a bi-directional virtual knowledge network whereby participants learn from experts and each other, gaining access to evidence-based and capacity-building resources. Each one-hour session includes a brief presentation by a national expert, followed by in-depth, practice-based presentations for discussion, problem-solving guidance, and recommendations.

If you are interested in participating, please complete the survey by Wednesday, November 29. Sessions will begin in January 2018 and will conclude in September 2018.
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Illinois Pubic Health Institute
The Midwest Forum on Hospitals, Health Systems and Population Health is bringing together health care and population health leaders dedicated to improving health, health equity and social determinants of health. Hosted by the Illinois Public Health Institute, the Forum is taking place in Chicago November 29 – December 1, 2017. ICAAP’s Obesity Prevention Initiatives team, Mary Elsner, Anna Carvlin, and Grecia Rodriguez, will also be presenting at a concurrent session entitled Innovation in Children’s Health Care: Linking Community, Providers, and Payers in System Approaches focusing on a unique clinical and community referral model to improve pediatric health behaviors by connecting medical providers and nonmedical community-based services that offer nutrition and physical activity programming for children. Register here.
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
The CDC web-based training course titled You Call the Shots was updated to include the 2017-18 ACIP recommendations. The nurse education training program has 16 modules on a variety of immunization topics including DTap, Hepatitis A, Influenza, Vaccine Storage and Handling, and more. Every month, CDC will update its program to reflect the latest immunization practices. Continuing education credit is available for nurses who view a module and complete an evaluation.

 
  ILLINOIS NEWS

 
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The Associated Press via U.S. News & World Report
A Chicago children's hospital has been recognized for its approach to relieving patients' pain. Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital reports it has been awarded a certificate for a "comprehensive approach to pain prevention and management in children." The certificate comes from the nonprofit Childkind International . The Boston-based organization is dedicated to reducing "pain and needless suffering" in all children.  READ MORE
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WREX-TV
"I was ready to march down that hospital and go and hold her for the first time," Kimberly Long says. That's how Dave and Kimberly Long describe the first moments after getting the call from the Illinois Department of Child and Family services that they would be bringing home a new baby girl. "We were having trouble having children of our own," Kimberly says.  READ MORE

 
 NATIONAL NEWS

 
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CNN
Codeine prescriptions for children who have had their tonsils and adenoids removed have decreased since the Food and Drug Administration began requiring a black box warning on the products four years ago, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, some children continue to be prescribed codeine, and other opioid prescriptions for children have continued to rise since then.  READ MORE
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The New York Times
Perri Klass, M.D. writes I weigh my words (pun intended) every time I address the topic of a child’s obesity in the exam room. Yes, I know, you probably want to tell me that I shouldn’t use that word — “obese” — and I promise that I don’t. But in the child’s electronic medical record, that’s the official coding if the child’s body mass index is at or above the 95th percentile for age and gender. And medical providers, just like parents, may find themselves walking a difficult line as they try to discuss this fraught subject without increasing the distress that many children are already feeling.  READ MORE
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NPR
A little spit may help predict whether a child's concussion symptoms will subside in days or persist for weeks. A test that measures fragments of genetic material in saliva was nearly 90 percent accurate in identifying children and adolescents whose symptoms persisted for at least a month, according to a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics.  READ MORE

 
 MISSED AN ISSUE OF ICAAP-LETS UPDATE? VISIT AND SEARCH THE ARCHIVE TODAY.

 
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Medical Xpress
In a study that looked at data over a 10-year period, York University researchers, in collaboration with Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), found that more than two-thirds of youth and children with an acute concussion do not seek medical follow-up or clearance as recommended by current international concussion guidelines.  READ MORE
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HealthDay News
As challenging as it can be to raise a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research offers biological evidence that calm, positive parenting may help these kids master their own emotions and behaviors. The study was conducted with parents of preschool children with the developmental disorder. The physiological effects of using compliments and praise instead of yelling and criticizing were almost instant, the researchers found.  READ MORE
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ScienceDaily
Scientists looked at the relationships among maternal snoring, childhood snoring and children's metabolic characteristics -- including body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance, which reflects future risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease — in approximately 1,100 children followed from gestation through early adolescence.  READ MORE

 
 TRENDING ARTICLES

Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.
Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.

 

ICAAP-lets Update

Connect with ICAAP

Recent Issues | Subscribe | Unsubscribe | Advertise | Web Version 


Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469-420-2601 | Download media kit
Christina Nava, Senior Editor, 469-420-2612  | Contribute news

American Academy of Pediatrics Illinois Chapter
1400 W. Hubbard, Suite 100  | Chicago, IL 60642-8195 | 312-733-1026 | Contact Us 

Learn how to add us to your safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox.
 

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

 
 

 
 
 
 
The Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services has posted new provider notices regarding Succeeding in the New Managed Care Program Series .   You may view each of the notices from the links below:
 
Succeeding in the New Managed Care Program Series:
 
(#1): What is my relationship with health plans that weren't awarded a contract for the new program?
https://www.illinois.gov/hfs/MedicalProviders/notices/Pages/prn171030b.aspx

(#2): Four key ways the new managed care will mean less work for providers
https://www.illinois.gov/hfs/MedicalProviders/notices/Pages/prn171030c.aspx

(#3): Simplified credentialing: Cutting back on provider overhead costs
https://www.illinois.gov/hfs/MedicalProviders/notices/Pages/prn171030d.aspx

 (#4): How HFS and the health plans will communicate transition details to clients  https://www.illinois.gov/hfs/MedicalProviders/notices/Pages/prn171030e.aspx
 
(#5): How you can help your patients understand what they need to know about this?
https://www.illinois.gov/hfs/MedicalProviders/notices/Pages/prn171103a.aspx

 
 
Please Note:  These and other notifications are located on the HFS Website at: https://www.illinois.gov/hfs/MedicalProviders/notices/Pages/default.aspx





 

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